Self storage can be an important asset in protecting and preserving private information, but only if certain steps are taken. When planning to archive business or personal documents in a self-storage unit, be sure to consider these tips from USA Storage Center: 

 Tip #1: Make sure the security features available at the self-storage facility are optimal:

     •  Convenient operating hours when you or your employees can access the information 
     •  Keypad entry systems, security cameras, perimeter fencing and lighting should be in good condition 
     •  Facility manager lives on site or  is on duty at the facility during hours you will be visiting your unit  
     •  Although not usually considered a security feature, climate control is essential for protecting documents against extreme temperatures                      and humidity. Check to see if climate control or air conditioning is available at your facility 

Tip #2: Pack documents with security and safety in mind

     •  Make multiple backups of all stored documents and keep them in a separate location 
     •  Consider using locked containers such as file cabinets or firesafes 
     •  Store all documentation on password-protected CD or DVD 
     •  Fill boxes, even if just with packing material – loosely packed materials can shift during transport and lifting 
     •  Packed boxes should weigh no more than 30-50 lbs. for safe lifting 

 Tip #3: Preserve paper, videos, DVDs and CDs with proper packing

     •  Raise boxes off the ground with pallets, wood, plastic or cardboard 
     •  Use airtight packaging to prevent mildew or water damage 
     •  Consider anti-static packaging for videotapes, DVDs and CDs 
     •  Do not use newspaper, as the print can transfer 
     •  Stack boxes with oldest information at the bottom in the back 
     •  Pack for longer than you plan to store – just in case 
     •  When packing files, place binders in between groupings to lend sturdiness 
     •  Label boxes clearly and carefully with waterproof labels / markers 

Your storage facility manager is an excellent resource for additional tips and assistance in protecting your important documents.
How to Store Antiques and Art
USA Storage Center
6463 Rockfish Rd.
Hope Mills, NC 28348
Phone 910-423-6464
FAYETTEVILLE
HOPE MILLS
RAEFORD
SANFORD
LUMBERTON
FT. BRAGG
SPRING LAKE
SOUTHERN PINES
PINEHURST
ABERDEEN
ELIZABETHTOWN
DUNN
CLINTON
LILLINGTON
STORAGE & MOVING TIPS
Packing & Storage Tips
Savvy Storage Solutions
Smart Self Storage
Helpful hints to make the packing and storing of your belongings a breeze!
  • Use furniture drawers to hold delicate items. Wrap them in bubble wrap or newspaper. 

  • When packing toys or smaller objects, remember to fill boxes completely, stuffing open areas with plain newspaper to prevent collapsing when stacked. 

  • Be careful not to store anything combustible (such as paint and chemicals) or perishable (such as food that is not permanently sealed). 

  • When storing lawn and garden equipment, drain any fluids prior to storage in order to avoid corrosive damage. 

  • Use trash cans to store shovels, hoes and rakes. 

  • Always use high quality locks on your unit. USA Storage Center sells locks on-site; ask the Store Manager for details. 

  • When storing delicate heirlooms, use specially constructed boxes, such as wardrobe boxes, and utilize dehumidifiers to prevent mildew build up. 

  • Store furniture carefully on boards or pallets. 

  • Cover mattresses and store them flat on level surfaces. 

  • Store small items like pots and pans in large appliances, such as stoves or refrigerators. 

  • Break down items (such as table legs) and store large furniture (like tabletops and sofas) on end to save space. 

  • Use protective covers and treat wood surfaces before storing. 

  • When storing business files, label all boxes and construct aisles so files are easily seen and accessible.

  • Clean furniture, boxes and the storage unit of all food and perishables.
Packing Efficiently for Storage
Self-storage units don’t have to be a space you visit once or twice a year to dig something out of a stack of boxes. They can be highly organized, easily accessible spaces that free up necessary space in your home or office. To get the most out of them, though, it is best to plan ahead before you start loading up the truck. Here are steps to help you plan:

Step 1: Plan What You Will Store

     1.  Start by identifying items that will be packed in boxes and stacked.  

     2.  Prioritize boxed items you will want to access most frequently (they’ll go closer to the front of the unit).  

     3.  Group by fragility or weight – heavier, sturdier items should be stored on the bottom of stacked items, fragile items on top. 

     4.  Consider awkwardly-sized items that won’t stack well, including how often you will need to use them, and how heavy they are.  

Step 2: Choose the Right Size Unit

Nobody wants to pay for storage they don’t need. But a little extra space makes moving around within the unit much easier. It also gives you room to add those unplanned items that always seem to pop up. 

Storage facility managers can be quite helpful in determining how much space you will need. The Extra Space Virtual Storage Unit Selector is also helpful in calculating size requirements.

Step 3: Organize and Pack Your Items with a Plan in Mind

Organizing and efficiently packing your items will take time and concentration. However, the up-front effort will be well worth it when you’re able to easily unload and organize your items at the storage unit. Here are some tips for packing:

Invest in Supplies

     •  Use boxes, not plastic bags. Boxes are sturdier and stack well, taking up less space. Many moving companies require that goods be                     packed in boxes for transport. Also, sealed plastic bags can trap humidity which can cause damaging mildew.
     •  Invest in good quality, sturdy boxes and packing materials. Boxes should be sturdy enough to hold up for years under the weight of the               stack. You may be tempted to get boxes for free from supermarkets and liquor stores; however, the mismatched shapes and sizes will                  impede your ability to organize most effectively. You can buy standard-sized boxes and specialty boxes for items such as TVs, videotapes           and pictures. 
     •  For wrapping breakables, paper will do, but bubble wrap can be used repeatedly, is cleaner, and because it is transparent, makes                          identifying contents easier. 
     •  Most people end up needing more tape than they thought they would when packing. Your self-storage manager can help you estimate how           much tape you’ll need for the number of boxes you’ll be packing. Some places sell tape that is pre-labeled. 

For your convenience, packing supplies such as boxes, bubble wrap and tape are available for purchase at the storage facility.

Packing in Boxes

     •  Box up everything that you can. Anything left unboxed in a self-storage facility can get dusty. 
     •  Fill boxes to capacity. The contents in half-empty boxes can shift during transport or lifting. Corners and sides can collapse if there’s                    nothing to support them. Foam peanuts are handy for filling in the gaps in boxes.
     •  Distribute the weight in packed boxes evenly. Make sure they are not too heavy for you and others who may be lifting them. 
     •  Wrap all fragile items and breakables such as dishes, glasses, ornaments, etc. separately. Pack these items tightly into strong or                          reinforced boxes, filling any gaps with paper or filler. Mark “Fragile” on any boxes containing breakable items.
     •  Clearly label all boxes on more than one side so you can easily identify the contents. 
     •  Pack books flat to avoid damaging their spines. 

Packing Other Items

     •  If you plan to store clothes, think about investing in a wardrobe box with a built-in hanging rod. These are available for purchase at most              storage and moving facilities.
     •  Large appliances must be prepared correctly for proper storage: 
               •  Defrost refrigerators and freezers thoroughly to avoid water damage and mildew growth. Tie down the appliance doors during                              transport, but leave them slightly ajar once in storage.  
               •  Drain washing machines, and tie down hoses and cords before storing them. 
               •  It’s a good idea to wipe down the inside of appliances with baking soda before you store them to keep them dry.
     •  Wrap mirrors and pictures in protective covering such as bubble wrap and mark them as “Fragile.” Cardboard corners can be purchased             to protect the sharpest, weakest areas of frames.
     •  If storing photographs, consider a climate controlled unit where temperature fluctuations will not damage your photos. If you do store                   loose photographs, place them between pieces of clean cardboard and consider taping them together to avoid curling.
     •  Separate lamp bases and lampshades and wrap them for protection.
     •  If you're storing upholstered products such as mattresses and sofas, consider investing in covers, bags or sheeting for additional                           protection. Storage and moving facilities often sell large heavy-duty bags for this purpose.
     •  Vacuum-sealed bags work really well for draperies, bedding, and clothing.
     •  Electrical equipment such as TVs, stereos, and computers should be packed in their original boxes whenever possible. If using other                    boxes, choose ones that are as close in size to the original as possible, and fill all gaps with paper. Make sure you secure the player arm            of a record player and turntable.
     •  Disassemble furniture such as beds and tables before you store them. Wrap and cover the separate sections, clearly mark them and keep           them together. Keep assembly components such as screws and bolts together in a plastic bag, mark them clearly, and tape the bag to the            appropriate piece of furniture. (Use tape that is safe for use on furniture, or tape the bag to an inconspicuous place on the piece.) Cover               chair legs with bubble wrap or rags for extra protection. 
     •  Spray your wood furniture with a good quality furniture polish before storing it to give it some added protection.
     •  Treat leather items with a leather conditioner before you store them.
     •  Wipe down metal objects and tools with a little oil before storing them to avoid rust formation that can occur when the tools are not used              regularly.
     •  When storing a vacuum cleaner, clean out the bag or canister first; bacteria, mold and vermin can accumulate otherwise. 
     •  When storing an oven as well as a refrigerator, enclose the exposed back area of the appliances to prevent vermin.
     •  Consider having awkward or heavy pieces such as exercise equipment packed professionally. Talk to your storage facility manager or                 local pack-and-ship store about options. 

As you go, keep an inventory of every item you’ve packed. Ideally, include an estimate of the replacement value of each item you store. Consider taking pictures of valuable items. These steps will help you make accurate insurance claims in case of unforeseen damage or loss.

Step 4: Unpack and Arrange Items Efficiently

Before you load up the truck to take your packed items to your self-storage unit, check with the storage facility manager to make sure there is adequate space for the truck to maneuver to your unit. 

As you arrive at the facility and begin to unload, arranging your furniture, equipment, boxes, and other odds-and-ends efficiently in your storage unit will make a big difference in maximizing its convenience.

Here are a few tried-and-true suggestions for putting items into your unit:

Plan Ahead

     •  While your storage unit should already be clean and swept out, consider putting down protective canvas sheeting, cardboard or wooden                boards on the floor for cleanliness.
     •  Keep a fold-up step stool in your space for accessing hard-to-reach areas.
     •  Based on the climate in which you live or work, consider putting down moisture absorbers, deodorizers and/or vermin bait to protect your             belongings.
     •  Frequently-used items should be placed near the entrance for easy access. This holds true for file boxes and other business items, too.
     •  To ensure security of valuable items such as computers or TVs, place them farthest from the door, with other items concealing them.
     •  Unload the largest items and place them against the far wall, as well as along the sides of the unit. See if the storage facility has dollies or            other machinery that you can use to unload and place these heavy items. Some self-storage companies will offer these free of charge.
     •  For archived business documents that you won’t need to access frequently, place them against the far wall of the unit.
     •  When arranging items, leave an aisle space for easy access to your items. You can either leave aisles between your stacks of boxes and              furniture, or line up all your furniture and boxes against the outside walls of the unit in a “U” shape, leaving the inside of the U as open                space. 

For furniture and other large items

     •  Break down furniture into smaller pieces, if possible. Take the legs off of tables, disassemble bed frames and lean them against the wall,            etc. 
     •  Cover furniture with sheets or tarps to protect them against scratches, dust and other damage..
     •  Store large pieces of furniture vertically to save space. Stand sofas on end when possible.
     •  If you have room to store a sofa flat, then a loveseat can be placed upside down on top of the sofa, and a table stacked on top of that.
     •  Chairs can be stacked seat to seat. 
     •  In most cases, you can stack dryers on top of washers. 

For odd-shaped, miscellaneous items

     •  You can tie tools and long-handled items such as rakes, snow shovels and brooms in bundles. Or, put them inside garbage cans to keep                them neat. 
     •  Mirrors and framed artwork should never be stored flat, as they can collapse under their own weight. 
     •  Be sure when stacking boxes and containers that you can clearly see the labels you put on them.
     •  When stacking boxes, always make sure to put the heaviest boxes at the bottom to avoid damage.
     •  Stack boxes and similarly sized items together to save space. 

Be creative

     •  You can use virtually all of the space in and around your stored furniture, including other items, as places to store more items. Fill                         anything that's hollow with items to maximize your available space:
     •  Furniture drawers are good for storing fragile items
     •  Stack the shelves of bookcases with books, small boxes and other odds and ends
     •  Store boxes containing fragile goods inside of wardrobes
     •  Store pillows, blankets and other bedding inside washers and dryers
     •  Store clothes inside dresser drawers 

You may be thinking that all this planning, preparing and setting up your self-storage unit may seem like a big project. You’ll find the time and effort are worth it, though, when you discover the peace of mind that comes with knowing your belongings are protected, conveniently accessible and well-preserved.
Security Options For Storage
If you have more possessions than places to put them, keeping your things secure in a rented storage unit is often a convenient solution. However, it’s important to make sure that your belongings will be not just secure but easily accessible. Security measures vary according to geographic location, facility policy and cost, so here are some things to keep in mind when looking for the right kind of storage for you. 

Facility Hours

For security purposes, the majority of self-storage properties have set hours during which renters can enter the property and access their storage unit. The property’s security system will prevent you from entering the property other than during these hours.   If your schedule is different than the hours the storage facility is open, storage may become more of a headache than a help. Be sure to know up front what times and days you will be allowed to access your belongings.

In some cases, you can rent a storage unit with 24-hour access for an increased fee. 

Locks & Security Systems

Although no security system is totally foolproof, there are security features that the facility should have to make sure both you and your stored items are as safe as possible: 

     •  When possible, choose a property that is completely fenced in. It should also be well lit. This is especially important if you will be                          accessing your storage unit when it’s dark, or at times when no managers are on duty.
     •  Almost all storage facilities have a keypad entry system at the main gate. When you rent a storage unit you will be given a unique access           code, which you’ll use to gain entry to the facility via the main gate’s keypad system. In addition to using the code, you will be responsible           for supplying some sort of lock for your individual storage unit. Remember that you will have the only key to your individual lock, unless             you ask the facility manager to “hold harmless” a key on file for you. That way, if you forget your key or if you need to have something              delivered to you storage unit in your absence, the manager will have a copy. 
     •  Finally, there should be at least one video surveillance camera at the main gate. This backs up the keypad entry system with a                             chronological visual history of all individuals who have entered and exited the facility. Some storage facilities have video cameras –                     sometimes as many as 15 or more – at other spots around the site, too. 

Manager on Duty

If you’re storing your belongings at a facility in a major city such as New York or Boston, ask the storage manager if the property is a “lock-down facility.” This means that a manager will be present whenever you have access to your storage, adding another level of security for you and your belongings. 

Manager on Site

Some storage facilities are managed by a staff member or owner who lives on site. Although this provides additional security, it does not mean that someone is monitoring security at all times.

Deliveries

If you’re a business owner, and will need to have deliveries accepted at the self-storage unit, there are several additional questions you should ask before renting a storage unit:

     1.  Can the storage facility accept deliveries on your behalf?

     2.  Are deliveries limited to specific times and days?

     3.  If deliveries are accepted, can they be delivered right to your storage unit?

     4.  If they can be delivered right to your storage unit, what is the maximum size of the delivery trucks that can enter the property and drive              up to your unit?

     5.  Does the property manager need to be present or can the delivery be made without the manager there? 
          The peace of mind that comes from secured storage is an important benefit for both individuals and business owners, but security policies           can become a hassle if you don’t know what you’re signing up for. Take the extra step to investigate the security options available at the            storage facility of your choosing, and maximize the convenience of your storage solution.
What Should or Should Not be Stored in a Self Storage Unit?
Self-storage is an excellent option for storing overflow of many different types of materials from your home or business. You can think of your storage unit as a second garage or business supply room.

When planning what to store in your unit, whether for business or personal purposes, consider that all storage facilities have restrictions on what they will allow you to store on their premises. This is for the protection of not just you and your belongings, but the facility staff and other customers and their goods. You will be required to sign a lease indicating that you understand and agree to adhere to the rules and restrictions for what items are allowable. As a general rule, any item or material that is considered “inherently dangerous” will not be allowed.  

In preparation for renting a storage unit, make out a preliminary inventory of the items you wish to store. Bring this with you to review with the storage facility manager to make sure you’ll be in full compliance with the list of allowable items. Full disclosure of what you will be storing is required. Or, if you’re not sure if an item is allowed, call the self-storage facility ahead of time to find out. This will prevent any related inconvenience upon arriving at the storage site. 

USA Storage Center frequently gets questions about what is acceptable to store. Here is a list of items and materials about which we are commonly asked:

Combustible, Flammable, Hazardous or Toxic Materials 

Considered “inherently dangerous,” these include gasoline, compressed gas, propane tanks, kerosene, lamp and motor oil, acid, grease, corrosives, fertilizer, paint, cleaners, chemicals, narcotics, or hazardous, toxic or biological waste. Asbestos or products containing asbestos are not allowed. You also cannot store fireworks, explosives, weapons or ammunition.

Tires & Vehicles

Storing vehicles is generally acceptable, as long as they are registered, insured and in operational condition. Most facilities will not let you store more than four tires in your self-storage unit because of the cost to dispose of them. 

Medical/Pharmaceutical Supplies & Equipment

If you are a sales representative, you may find a self-storage unit a convenient place to manage medical supplies and pharmaceutical samples. It is a useful way to keep your products organized and easily accessible without cluttering up your office or filling your car trunk. While most supplies are acceptable, radioactive equipment – or anything that contains radioactive materials – cannot legally be stored. 

Construction Equipment

If you work in construction, it can be convenient to stop by the storage unit on the way to the site and pick up the equipment you need. However, please check with the self-storage facility before planning to store any construction equipment. Some equipment – for example, equipment used to locate underground water – is prohibited.

Perishable Food and Animal Products

Canned foods can be stored in storage units, but perishable food products such as cereals, produce or meats are not allowed. These may spoil or attract pests. 

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items

Any animals or plants – alive or dead – cannot be stored. Nor can any stolen items. People are not allowed to plug in or use refrigerators, freezers, generators, space heaters or live in storage units.

If you have any question about the items you wish to store, consult the manager of the self-storage facility before you pack and arrive at the site.
Why Climate Controlled Storage?
Severe hot or cold weather can damage items stored in storage units. Important documentation for your home or business, computer equipment and electronics, wood or leather furniture, photographs, books, clothing, artwork and other valuable possessions can be destroyed if not properly protected. If you live or work in a geographic area with these weather conditions, climate-controlled storage units provide the ideal solution for storing your personal or business-related items.

Climate control maintains a steady temperature of 55–80° using central air conditioning and heat. Maintaining a controlled environment prevents:

     •  Warping, cracking and splitting 
     •  Rust, yellowing and corrosion 
     •  Mold, mildew and bacteria overgrowth 
     •  Infestation of wasps, mice, termites and other vermin 

Climate-controlled storage units are typically part of a finished building with indirect heating and cooling (compared to air conditioners or heaters within individual units). The enclosed environment of these buildings can also provide increased protection from dust, dirt and flooding. 

How to Choose a Climate-Controlled Space

Follow these three steps to determine whether climate control is an appropriate investment for your needs:

Step 1: Consider Your Geographic Area

As a general rule, the temperature in climate-controlled storage units should not fall below freezing in the winter, or rise above 90°F (32°C) in the summer. If the geographic area where you live or work exceeds 90 degrees in the summer but does not freeze in the winter, air-conditioning would be a viable option to consider. Same with only extreme cold temperatures – a heated storage unit would work well. If your area experiences both extreme hot and cold temperatures, climate control may provide the best benefit. 

Step 2: Consider What You Plan to Store  

The following is a list of items commonly stored in USA Storage Center's climate-controlled storage.  

Home Goods                                                                     Equipment

     •  Leather or wood furniture                  •  Computers & computer parts 
     •  Antiques & heirlooms                               •  Video equipment 
     •  Clothing  •  Audio equipment 
     •  Furs •  Tools & machines 
     •  Craft supplies•  Restaurant equipment 
     •  Plastics   •  Construction supplies
     •  Food stuffs    •  Business Items
     •  Paintings & other fine art   •  Products & supplies
     •  Photographs   •  Software, videos, DVDs & CDs 
     •  Musical Instruments    •  Pharmaceutical samples & medical supplies 
     •  Media such as DVDS, CDS, vinyl records,     •  Archival documents, tax files, & other paperwork 
        cassettes & 8-track tapes    •  Seasonal inventory 
     •  Cameras 
     •  Televisions & stereos 

If you plan to frequently access your stored items as you add, remove or organize them, keep in mind your comfort when working within your storage unit. A pleasant temperature can make the job much easier.

Step 3: Consider the Value of What You Plan to Store

Climate control storage units cost more than standard units. To determine whether the cost is justified, it’s important to assess the value of what you plan to store. If you are packing away electronics, products or equipment that are covered by insurance, and replacing them would mean only an inconvenience, you may decide that a standard storage space is sufficient. If, however, you are storing items of sentimental value or historical documents for your business, the additional cost may be insignificant, especially if it gives you peace of mind. Whether your items would be costly and inconvenient to replace, or irreplaceable, if you are going to pay to store them it is wise to store them well.   

Contact your USA Storage Center self-storage manager for more information about climate control and other storage options.
Choosing Boxes and Packing Materials
Once the decision to move things into storage is made, the next step is to decide how to pack them correctly. The first step is finding boxes. Many of us have made the mistake of going to local liquor stores or grocery stores, only to find that they break down boxes almost as soon as they receive them. If they do save boxes, they typically are a variety of different sizes, somewhat damaged, or contaminated with bugs or food residue. 

Buying boxes may seem at first to be a luxury expense, but the purchase is certainly worth the investment if it safely preserves your belongings. Here are several reasons for purchasing boxes:

Reasons for Purchasing Boxes

     •  The total number of needed boxes can be purchased in one trip, rather than hunting from store to store and relying on what’s available 
     •  The sizes of boxes are standard and predictable (Small, Medium, Large, Extra-Large), rather than working with whatever sizes are                      available 
     •  Boxes are often grooved so that the flaps can be bent to accommodate different sizes 
     •  Although most boxes are standard in dimension and intended for general use, there are unique boxes specifically designed for a purpose,            such as telescoping boxes for large mirrors or pictures, and wardrobe boxes with built-in hanging rods 
     •  Using boxes of the same size and shape makes stacking easy 
     •  Durability and cleanliness are guaranteed 
     •  Sturdy, quality boxes provide extra protection for fragile items and won’t collapse as easily under other boxes 
     •  Moving companies typically require quality, well-sealed boxes and may repack them at an extra charge if they are flimsy or dirty 
     •  Whereas discarded boxes are intended for temporary use, purchased boxes can be used and reused over the long term; one way to reuse           them is to cut the tops off boxes and stack on them on their sides to create shelving in the storage unit 
     •  When boxes are no longer needed, they can be broken down in neat stacks and donated or given away 
        The expense of purchasing boxes can be mitigated with smart choices when it comes to packing materials and methods. Here are some               steps to save money and avoid headaches:

Tips for Choosing & Using Packing Materials

     •  When choosing box sizes, keep in mind not just what they can store, but how easy they will be to transport; choose smaller boxes for                    books and heavy items, and larger boxes for linens and clothing 
     •  Avoid using newsprint to wrap items – the ink can transfer and stain; consider using clean, plain wrapping/butcher paper, quality paper                 towels or thin foam sheets for inexpensive items, and felt or bubble wrap for valued breakables 
     •  Estimate how much tape you’ll need to secure both the bottoms and tops of boxes (they may be turned upside down or topple during the              move) and then buy double that amount of tape (it goes fast) 
     •  Dish pack and glass pack kits are boxes that come with cardboard dividers and foam pockets for easy packing; plastic, fabric-lined dish              storage containers can be purchased at house wares retailers 
     •  Fill boxes full, but not too full – boxes with loose contents can wobble and shift, and boxes that are too full can crush contents when being             moved; use packing peanuts, clothing or towels to fill in spaces •Rolls of shrink wrap can be purchased to wrap cabinets, appliances,                   dressers and desks to keep drawers and doors shut; remove shrink wrap after relocation 
     •  Mattress covers and sofa covers can be purchased for the move; sealed plastic covers should not be left on for long-term storage as                   moisture can promote the growth of mold and mildew – a canvas tarp or sheet is recommended for a storage period lasting more than a                week 

Storage facilities and packing supply stores offer a variety of packing supplies, boxes, locks, covers and other handy items. Your self-storage facility manager can be a great resource for creative ways to use these materials to solve packing and moving problems.
Comparing Outdoor, Drive-Up and Indoor Storage Units
Although each storage facility differs in its offerings, many facilities have three basic kinds of storage units from which to choose: outdoor, drive-up and indoor. Here we compare them, as well as frequently-available upgrades. 

Outdoor Storage Units

These least expensive units can be the size of a four-wheel-drive or 40-foot RV. Typically paved or gravel-filled, outdoor storage units are basically parking spaces. They may come with a metal roof, cinder block walls, and hookups for recreational vehicles. They are popular with:

     •  Landscaping businesses that haul equipment with trailers 
     •  Short haul trucking companies 
     •  Individuals and business owners in metropolitan areas where convenient parking is at a premium 

Drive-Up Storage Units

These ground-floor units are usually the size of a one-car garage, although several sizes can be available in the same facility. Most have 9-10 ft. ceilings, although some can be as high as 12 or 20 ft. They feature a roll-up door, making for easy loading and unloading. In some instances, they can be climate controlled with central air coolilng and heat to maintain an internal temperature between 50 and 80 degrees year round. 

Drive-up units are popular among:

     •  Businesses as a way of expanding their square footage for storage of files, equipment, etc.  
     •  Retail stores for storage of seasonal inventory, signage, etc. 
     •  Storage of cars, small-engine vehicles, tools, furniture, appliances and anything else that might be stored in a garage 

Because these units are on the ground floor and easily accessible, they are often preferred by customers.

Indoor Storage Units

These units are part of a building, and are accessible by entering through doors and using elevators between floors. Some units within the building might be climate-controlled, while others are just slightly more sheltered from the elements than drive-up units.

First-floor units in these buildings are highly desirable, as they are the most easily accessible. They are typically smaller, and may have roll-up doors or common swing doors. They offer some additional security, as they are usually well-lit.

Indoor storage units are popular among:

     •  Customers who prefer to store their belongings in a house-like setting rather than a garage 
     •  Pharmaceutical representatives, antiques dealers, and those with electronics, artwork or other valuable items who require a climate-                   controlled environment 

Upgrades

Features of storage units that often come with additional cost include:

     •  Availability to drive up 
     •  Unit is on the first or ground floor 
     •  Being on first floor 
     •  Convenient access to an elevator (most indoor, multi-floor storage buildings have elevators) 
     •  Climate control 
     •  Heat or air conditioning only (rather than climate control) 
     •  Dehumidifiers 
     •  Availability of insurance to cover items in storage 

Combining these features can increase cost as well. For example, a first-floor indoor unit close to an elevator will typically be more expensive than one on the second floor, and if it has climate-control there will be additional cost too. 

Facilities often offer free enhancements such as carpeted units, wooden or plastic pallets to place on the unit’s floor, dollies to transport items to and from the unit, etc. 

At USA Storage Center, we frequently offer packing and storage supplies for convenient purchase.

If you would like additional assistance in finding the right storage space for you, contact a facility manager.
Storing Important Documents
Antiques and art pieces are often treasured for the way they capture a moment in time. As heirlooms, investments or inventory, their value is based on how well they are preserved. When preparing to store paintings, antique furniture or mirrors, keep these tips in mind: 

Find the Right Self-Storage Unit

     •  Controlling the temperature within the storage unit is essential. When comparing facilities, ask about the availability of climate control.                This uses central air and heat to maintain a temperature within the unit of 50-80 degrees and reduce humidity. Some facilities have a                   dehumidifier as well -- usually for units on the first floor or subterranean levels. 
     •  Transporting your antiques or art from the truck to your unit can open up opportunities for damage. Consider looking for a drive up unit,              or an inside unit on the ground floor. If your unit is on an upper level, be sure there’s an elevator. Many facilities have dollies and carts               available for your use at the facility as well. 
     •  If it’s worth storing, it’s worth insuring. Most storage facilities require proof of insurance covering your belongings to at least $2,000. At             USA Storage Center, we offer affordable insurance policies for up to $10,000 that can be included in your rental agreement. 

Pack with Care

     •   Wrap mirrors and pictures in protective covering such as thick blankets, bubble wrap or felt, and mark them as “Fragile.” Clear plastic               wrap can be used instead of tape to secure packing materials – it comes on rolls sold at office and packing supply stores. Cardboard                    corners can be purchased to protect the sharpest, weakest areas of frames. Felt can be bought off the bolt at fabric stores. 
     •  Boxes specifically designed for packing mirrors or large paintings can be purchased at packaging supply stores. Some storage facilities              sell quality packing supplies including these boxes for your convenience. 
     •  Mirrors and framed artwork should never be stored flat, as they can collapse under their own weight. 
     •  If you're storing upholstered products such as mattresses and sofas, consider investing in covers, bags or sheeting for additional                          protection. Storage and moving facilities often sell large heavy-duty bags for this purpose. 
     •  Disassemble weak or heavy pieces of furniture, such as a mirror attached to a dresser, or a headboard from a bed frame. Wrap and cover          the separate sections, clearly marking them as parts of a whole. Keep assembly components such as screws and bolts together in a plastic          bag and tape the bag to bubble wrap or plastic wrapped around the appropriate piece of furniture.  
     •  Cover chair legs with bubble wrap or rags for extra protection. 
     •  Don’t stack antique furniture – leave it free standing. 
     •  Spray wood furniture with a good quality furniture polish before storing it to give it some added protection. 
     •  Treat leather items with a leather conditioner before you store them. 
     •  Wipe down metal objects and tools with a little oil before storing them to avoid rust formation that can occur when the tools are not used              regularly. 
     •  Separate lamp bases and lampshades and wrap them for protection. Remove any light bulbs. 
     •  Consider having awkward or heavy pieces packed professionally. Talk to your storage facility manager or local pack-and-ship store about          options. 

As you go, keep an inventory of every item you’ve packed – perhaps by taking a picture of each piece before it’s wrapped. Ideally, include an estimate of the replacement value of each item you store. These steps will help you make accurate insurance claims in case of unforeseen damage or loss, and estimate appropriate coverage levels.

Your self-storage facility manager can be a great resource for storage solutions and packing hints. Be sure to ask them for guidance – they may have important information you wouldn’t have considered otherwise.
How to Store Appliances
Finding extra space to store appliances can be a challenge, and self-storage can be a convenient solution. However, if you don’t take steps to prepare your clothes washer, dryer, dishwasher, refrigerator, microwave or other appliance properly, you might end up storing an unusable hunk of machinery instead. Here are some important tips to keep in mind when packing up and moving appliances:

Preparing to Move 

     •  Remove water from hoses and internal components of clothes washers, dryers, dishwashers and refrigerators to prevent freezing and                  mildew. 
     •  Clean appliances carefully, including all air intake areas such as lint filters, grids or tubes. 
     •  Spray appliances for bugs and allow to dry before relocating them. 
     •  For refrigerators, clean the interior and wipe dry. Drain water from the holding tank and plastic tubing. Clean the defrost pan (usually                 located underneath or in the back). 
     •  Always keep refrigerators upright during transportation and storage to prevent damage to the refrigeration unit. 
     •  For transport, use strong tape to keep dishwasher, oven and refrigerator doors closed. Remove the tape once the appliance has been                  relocated, storing with doors ajar or removed to prevent mildew growth. 
     •  Appliances contain glass and fragile pieces, and finishes can scratch and dent. Be sure to wrap them with moving blankets, bubble wrap or          wrapping film to prevent broken pieces or blemishes. Storage facilities frequently offer these packing materials for purchase. 
     •  When moving a household, load appliances on the truck last so they can be unloaded first at the storage unit. This will put them at the                 back of the unit, giving you easier access to frequently-used items. 

Storing Safely

     •  If your items will be stored in a geographical region that experiences extreme hot or cold temperatures, consider looking for climate-                  controlled storage. Using central air and heat, the temperature in these units is typically kept between 50 and 80 degrees. Protecting                   appliances from exposure to severe temperatures preserves their electronic and mechanical parts from cracking and rust.

        If you opt for a storage unit that does not have climate control, and your stored items have been exposed to freezing temperatures, be sure         to allow 24-48 hours for them to thaw before use.
     •  Mark glass panels in oven doors, microwave doors, etc. as fragile to avoid leaning heavy objects against them. 
     •  Appliances cannot be plugged in while in storage. 
     •  Storing items inside appliances is not recommended.  
     •  Cover appliances with cotton sheets or canvas tarps to protect them from dust while allowing for air circulation. 

        Keep in mind that your self-storage facility manager can be an excellent resource for additional guidance. Asking questions and doing                 research on how to store appliances properly will preserve both your belongings and your peace of mind.
How to Store ATVs, Jet Skis, Snowmobiles, and Motorcycles
Big toys with wheels tend to take up a lot of storage space, which can interfere with the fun of having them, or keep you from owning them at all. However, self-storage can provide as much space for all the ATVs, jet skis, snowmobiles, motorcycles, etc. as your pocketbook can handle. 

Regardless of how many small-engine vehicles you own, storing them smartly makes for more fun with them…faster. Here are some tips on how to get the most out of different self-storage solutions:

Size and Capacity

     •  When considering the amount of space you’ll need to store your ATV, jet ski, snowmobile or motorcycle, be sure to include extra room for          all the equipment that comes with it. If you do have protective gear, trailers or car racks, etc. that you wish to store with your small craft, a         closed unit would provide necessary containment not offered by a covered outdoor space. 
     •  Be sure to check the width of the door to a potential storage unit. Some equipment, such as double trailers, may be too wide for a drive-up          or inside unit, so covered parking would be the better option.

Convenience

     •  Apartment, housing, or municipal restrictions on parking may cramp your style, but self-storage provides an easy solution.  
     •  Most facilities expect that leased space will be used only for storage, and not as a workshop. Repairing or extensive maintenance of small          vehicles should not be done at the self storage facility.  
     •  Vehicles that are required to be licensed must have current license plates. If your tags expire while in storage, your storage facility may              ask you to renew them. 
     •  Storage facilities typically require proof of vehicle registration. They may also require proof of insurance, since individual property is not            covered by the facility’s insurance. 

Safety 

     •  Protection from the elements is a clear benefit of self storage, whether you choose a covered parking spot, a drive-up unit or an inside unit         to store your small-engine vehicle. Use accessories like vinyl covers, tire locks and tie downs for additional protection (check with your               facility manager to see what tie-down options are available). 
     •  Security features such as entry keypads and security cameras that typically come with self-storage solutions can lend much more peace of          mind than parking your two- or four-wheeled toys in your driveway or yard. 
     •  If you are considering covered parking, keep in mind that some facilities may offer a simple aluminum roof while others offer cinder block          structures – compare facilities for the solution that suits you best. 
     •  In geographic regions where temperatures reach extremes, consider the option of climate-controlled storage. This option (offered by some         facilities at modest additional cost) assures that the temperature in your unit will be kept around 70-80 degrees. The controlled climate                prevents damage due to humidity, heat or cold, and provides a comfortable environment in which you can work on organizing or                            maintaining your vehicles and equipment. 
     •  Always remove as much gasoline as possible from the fuel tank before storing any vehicle, to prevent leaks and fire hazards. Especially             when vehicles will be stored over long periods of time, check fuel lines and gaskets, and lay down cardboard or mats to prevent damage to          the unit’s floor. 
     •  Any vehicle with wheels (or the trailer on which it arrives or is stored) must be road-worthy. Keep an eye on tires that can dry rot or                    deflate.  Restrictions vary by facility, so check with your facility manager about your role in maintaining stored vehicles. 

Your storage facility manager is a great resource to help you make smart choices in self-storage.
How to Store Books, Magazines, and Media
Special care should be taken when packing books, magazines, videotapes, CDs and DVDs for storage, as these items are more susceptible to environmental damage such as humidity, dust and yellowing.  Spending time and money in properly packing and organizing these materials is a worthwhile investment. 

Whether you’re a book dealer storing inventory, a collector storing comic books, a business storing sensitive data on DVD, or you simply pride yourself on your mammoth CD collection, be sure to keep these tips in mind:

All Print Materials and Media

     •  Consider using locking storing containers, file cabinets or fire safes 
     •  Use wood, cardboard or plastic to raise storage containers off the floor 
     •  Label boxes and containers for easy reference 
     •  Do not use newspaper for packing – the print can transfer 
     •  Use same-size, quality boxes for easy stacking 
     •  Pack all non-essential items first 
     •  Fill boxes to prevent shifting during transport or lifting 
     •  Pack for long-term storage, even if you plan to only store your items for a couple months, just in case 

Books and Magazines

     •  Climate control is extremely important for the preservation of books and magazines, as it prevents damage from extreme temperatures              (ask your self-storage facility manager about this option which is often available for moderate additional cost) 
     •  Place a piece of paper inside the front cover and wrap around to the back cover to prevent sticking (use paper on rolls to make this easier) 
     •  When placing books or magazines in boxes, alternate placing the spine to the right or left 
     •  Seal in archival plastic bags 
     •  Place a piece of strong cardboard, plastic or wood between magazines to prevent warping 

DVDs, CDs, Video Tapes and other Media

     •  Always pack media in airtight, heavy duty bags or containers 
     •  When possible, store media in the original cases for additional protection 
     •  Anti-static bags are recommended 
     •  Videotapes are particularly sensitive to moisture – package them individually in airtight bags 

At USA Storage Center, we make sure that quality packing materials are available at our facilities for convenient and proper packing. Ask your facility manager for other important considerations when storing valuable property in your self-storage unit.
How to Store Clothing and Furs
Freeing up closet space is a biannual ritual for many of us, swapping out shorts and swimsuits for coats and sweaters. It can be liberating to clean out closets – pondering the passage of time while donating old items and packing away others for storage. But the piles get high quickly, and can take up a surprising amount of room. Using a self-storage unit for seasonal or long-term storage of clothing and furs can be a space-saving, convenient solution. 

Just folding garments and putting them in a box, bag or bin, however, can be a costly mistake. There are specific ways to pack clothes – especially those made with quality fabrics, leather or fur – to preserve them well. The following are steps you can take to prevent damage to fabrics and furs, and get the most out of both your clothing and self-storage.

Choosing a Storage Solution 

     •  Choose a space that will be cool and dry all year long. Your garage may seem like the logical place to store extra clothing, but fluctuations           in temperature, exposure to sunlight and pests can cause significant damage to fabrics, leather and fur. Cooler temperatures help prevent           mold growth, the presence of pests, molting of furs and drying out of leather. 
         A climate-controlled self-storage unit keeps the temperature between approximately 50 and 80 degrees with the use of central air and                 heat. When comparing storage facilities, ask about the availability of climate control, air conditioning and dehumidifiers. 
     •  Sunlight can cause fading and attract insects. Using see-through plastic storage containers may make it convenient to see what’s inside,              but if stored in a windowed garage or basement they can open up the possibility for some unpleasant surprises. Self-storage units offer the          necessary darkness needed for proper preservation.

Proper Packing Materials

     •  Plastic bags including vacuum-seal bags should be avoided when storing expensive clothing. Not only can they permanently crush fabrics            and furs, but the airtight seals can cause mildew and mold growth. 
     •  If hanging garments, use non-rusting hangers and allow plenty of space between items. Wardrobe boxes are specifically made for storing            clothes, and come with a built in hanging rod. They are particularly useful for packing furs, suits and other garments that must be hung. At          USA Storage Center, we offer these and other quality packing supplies for purchase.
     •  Rolling garment carts can be used in combination with garment bags to hang clothing in storage.
     •  Use sheets of acid-free white tissue to separate garments and line boxes or bins. Use white muslin garment covers.
     •  Chemical desiccants (such as the inedible packets found in food or prescription items) can be used to absorb moisture and prevent mold              growth. These are frequently available for purchase at self-storage facilities.
     •  Ventilation is important when preserving natural fabrics such as cotton, wool, silk and linen, as well as suede and leather. A wicker trunk            or unused suitcase can be a great choice for fabrics that can be folded and stacked safely. 
     •  When stacking folded garments, place the heaviest at the bottom of the pile. Fold and stack them loosely.
     •  Not all clothes should be folded and stacked. Fur in particular must be hung from the shoulders. Placing fur in a plastic bag, or packing it in         between hung items, can permanently crush the fur.
     •  Cedar blocks, mothballs, etc. can be used in addition to pest control methods provided by the facility. Since they are toxic, avoid using                  mothballs anywhere where children may be present. 
     •  Avoid storing clothing in dresser drawers or trunks that are lined with wallpaper or adhesive liner paper, as the glue can attract pests.                 Glued boxes can present the same problem.
     •  Avoid using starch or fabric finish on any garments that will be stored.
     •  Fur should be stored in professional cold storage for best results.

Taking steps to preserve your clothing pays off in long-lasting, well-kept wear. For additional storage success strategies, ask your facility manager. 
How to Store Computers and Electronics
Protecting computers and electronics from damage while they are in storage is a straightforward process, and an important one. Rust, mold, cracking, breakage or flooding can render a high-end piece of equipment useless. The following are recommended steps to make sure you will be able to unpack your computer, printer, scanner, media component, power tool, etc. in the same working condition it was originally stored. 

Selecting a Storage Unit

     •  Controlling the temperature within a self-storage unit is crucial when it comes to electronics. If your equipment will be stored in a                         geographical region that experiences extreme hot or cold temperatures, look for a facility that offers climate-controlled storage. Using                central air and heat, the temperature in these units is typically kept between 50 and 80 degrees. This prevents cracking and corrosion from        damaging electrical components.
       (If equipment has been stored in freezing temperatures, be sure to wait 48 hours for the device to warm up before turning it on.) 
     •  Equally important is moisture control. Although climate control can reduce moisture somewhat, a facility that uses a dehumidifier to keep           dampness out is of key importance in humid climates or underground storage. When choosing which storage space you will rent, avoid                ground-level or subterranean units. 

Safe Storage

     •  Always back up data in several different ways and store in several different locations. 
     •  Take tapes out of VCRs, camcorders and data backup devices, and CDs and DVDs out of drives and players. 
     •  Cover equipment with a cotton sheet or canvas cover to prevent dust buildup while allowing for air circulation. 
     •  Never wrap computers or electronic devices in plastic for long term storage. Plastic traps moisture in, and fosters mold and mildew growth. 
     •  Use boards or pallets to raise equipment off the floor; some facilities offer free pallets for use in the facility. 
     •  When possible, store devices in their original boxes and packing. 
     •  Protect monitors, screens, scanner glass and other fragile parts with cardboard or pieces of bubble wrap or foam and tape. Mark glass                parts as fragile to avoid leaning heavy objects against them. 
     • Equipment cannot be plugged in while in storage. 

Keep in mind that your self-storage facility manager can be an excellent resource for additional guidance. Asking questions and doing research on how to store computers and electronics properly will preserve both your belongings and your peace of mind.
How to Store Fine China and Crystal
Whether they’re family treasures or inventory for your antique store, china and crystal must be packed the right way to prevent shattered pieces… and peace of mind. Here are some tips our USA Storage Center facility managers recommend to our self-storage customers:

Tip #1: Use quality materials specifically made for dishes

     •  Dish protection kits are a handy way to purchase all the materials you need at once. A kit typically includes a sturdy box, cardboard                    separators and foam pockets of different sizes for individual plates. Boxes hold 6-8 dinner plates. Dish protection kits can be purchased at          most self-storage facilities.
     •  Sheets of felt can be purchased at fabric and craft stores, and placed between plates. Yards of felt can be bought off the bolt for wrapping           tea pots, platters, etc.
     •  Some home goods stores sell storage bags specifically designed to store china. They are typically cloth or plastic bags, felt-lined and                   closed with zippers.
     •  If you do not wish to use boxes, consider mid-sized Tupperware containers with handles on either side.

Tip #2: Pack dishes with care

     •  Store 6-8 plates per box.
     •  If using foam pockets, place only one plate in each pocket.
     •  Stack no more than 6 plates to avoid putting pressure on the bottom plates.
     •  For items that have lids, such as teapots, wrap the lid with felt, foam or high quality paper towels, then turn the lid over so the top hangs              inside the vessel. 
     •  For extremely fragile pieces such as bone china, wrap the piece loosely first in felt or foam, then bubble wrap. Be careful not to wrap too             tightly. 
     •  Keep boxes light and well balanced.

Tip #3: Use quality materials specifically made for glassware

     •  Like dish protection kits, glassware protection kits come with everything you need. A kit typically includes a sturdy box, cardboard                     separators and foam pockets for individual glasses, mugs or wine glasses. Boxes usually hold 12 8-oz. glasses. Glassware protection kits            can be purchased at most self-storage facilities.
     •  Bubble wrap can be used for wrapping, although it takes up more room per item. 
     •  Sheets of felt or high quality paper towels can be wrapped around glasses.
     •  If you do not wish to use boxes, consider mid-sized Tupperware containers with handles on either side. 

Tip #4: Pack glassware with care

     •  When putting glasses in a box, stand them on end and place cut-up cardboard between wrapped glasses.
     •  Pack enough glasses in one box that there is no tilting or shifting, but do not pack them together tightly.
     •  When wrapping wine glasses, do not put pressure on their stems.
     •  For extremely fragile pieces, wrap the piece loosely first in felt or foam, then bubble wrap. Be careful not to wrap too tightly. 
     •  Stack boxes of glasses on top of heavier boxes (not underneath) to avoid crushing due to weight.
     •  Keep boxes light and well balanced.

Be sure to keep track of what’s in each box so you don’t have to hunt for an item later on. Unwrapping fragile pieces to see what’s inside is a hassle, and creates additional risk of breakage. Consider labeling each item with a number, and putting that number on a list along with a description. This list becomes even more important when you provide it to your insurance company as part of your coverage estimate.

Your self-storage facility manager can be an excellent resource for tips and solutions. Feel free to ask him or her questions about how you can get the most out of self storage.
How to Store Furniture
Most of us forget how heavy our furniture it is and how much room it takes up until it comes time to move it. Using self-storage for additional space can cut down on how often you end up relocating extra dressers, sofas, mattresses, desks or pianos, providing convenience and peace of mind. Here are some helpful hints for storing furniture: 

Find the Right Self-Storage Unit

      •  Consider looking for a drive up unit, or an inside unit on the ground floor. If your unit is on an upper level, be sure there’s an elevator.                Many facilities have dollies and carts available for your use at the facility. 
     •  Controlling the temperature within the storage unit is essential. When comparing facilities, ask about the availability of climate control.               This uses central air and heat to maintain a temperature within the unit of 50-80 degrees and reduce humidity. Some facilities have a                   dehumidifier as well -- usually for units on the first floor or subterranean levels. 
     •  If it’s worth storing, it’s worth insuring. Most storage facilities require proof of insurance covering your belongings to at least $2,000. You          may find that your homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy does not cover property stored in a storage facility. At USA Storage Center, we offer           affordable insurance policies for up to $10,000 that can be included in your rental agreement. 

Safe Storage

     •  Use pallets or boards to raise the floor of the unit to protect against flooding; put down a plastic tarp over this raised floor to create a                   moisture barrier. 
     •  Cover furniture with cotton drop cloths or canvas tarps to keep dust off and allow airflow; make sure no fabric from furniture or covers is            touching the floor. 
     •  Bags specifically designed to protect mattresses, sofas and chairs can often be purchased at the storage facility, along with other packing           materials. 
     •  Stand sofas and mattresses on end to maximize space and prevent overloading. 
     •  Do not store anything near your sofa or mattresses that could transfer color. 
     •  Disassemble beds and tables, and wrap table legs in moving blankets or bubble wrap. 
     •  If a table will not disassemble, place a moving blanket on the pallets / boards on the floor, and place the table on its top with the legs                    pointing up. Place chairs upside down on tables which cannot be disassembled. 
     •  Stretch wrap can be used to keep cabinet doors or dresser drawers closed while moving. 
     •  Use bubble wrap or cardboard to protect corners and edges. 
     •  On mirrors and framed artwork, use cardboard corner protectors. Do not store these items flat, as they will collapse under their own                   weight. Keep them upright, and mark them as fragile. 
     •  Wrap lamp bases in bubble wrap or moving blankets and pack them in a box designed for storing lamps. Wrap lamp shades in a cotton                cover or loose plastic wrap and pack in a box. 
     •  Use dresser tops for stacking lightweight boxes, and dresser drawers for small fragile items.  
     •  If you use cleaning sprays on furniture prior to storing it, allow it to dry thoroughly – the residual moisture can cause mold growth while in           storage. 
     •  Avoid sealing anything in plastic – trapped moisture can cause mold, mildew and rot. 
     •  Liquid screen TVs and computer monitors can freeze and break without climate control in the unit. 

For more information on storing TVs, computers, fine art, antiques, photos or books, see other articles in this library.

Storage facility managers are excellent resources for getting the most out of your storage unit. Be sure to ask them for additional information and guidance for the best way to store your furniture.

How to Store Medical and Pharmaceutical Products
Pharmaceutical companies industry wide are now finding it more efficient to seek storage space using corporate reserves for their sales reps, rather than the representative finding their own space. 
Pharmaceutical sales reps use self-storage space as a “home base” for receiving shipments and storing inventory.  Having extra space to store drug samples, literature and marketing items close to their clients’ offices is essential to enhancing their daily productivity.

When establishing a Lease Agreement with a self-storage facility, pharma companies and their representatives will take the following into consideration:

     •  Location -- as it relates to the proximity to the sales territory is essential in saving valuable work time while keeping the Pharma rep out             in the field, face to face with clients 
     •  Climate-controlled space -- is required to prevent damage to pharmaceutical samples from extreme heat and cold, keeping the                              temperature within the unit between 50-80 degrees is often a necessity 
     •  Security features -- providing a safe environment for the rep includes state-of-the-art-security with video cameras, perimeter fencing, on-            site management, keypad access and other risk-prevention services 
     •  Environment & Access -- facilities and units must be clean, well-lit and allow keypad access during the hours the pharmaceutical                          representative will be working; access to a hand held cart is essential to moving items from the storage unit to the car 
     •  Deliveries -- Pharmaceutical reps rely on facility staff to receive and temporarily store packages while they are out selling to their clients.          Once a package arrives and a facility staff member signs for it, then the representative is notified by phone, and will hold the package for           24 hours 

Storage facility managers become an important asset when establishing cost-saving services, such as package acceptance that support the needs of pharmaceutical representatives and their employers.
How to Store Medical, Legal, and Financial Data
Self-storage units provide a convenient way to store corporate documentation, but keeping these records secure requires diligence. Long-term storage of sensitive data such as protected health information or audit compliance documentation should be included in a risk prevention plan for your business. As you evaluate self-storage facilities for security services and features, consider the following guidance: 

Security Features at Self-Storage Facilities

     •  Confirm what hours you will have access to the storage unit – or speak with your facility manager about setting specific hours for access 
     •  Gated keypad entry systems track traffic in and out 
     •  Perimeter fencing should surround the entire facility - check it for condition 
     •  Camera range and the number of security cameras varies between facilities, as does the use of Digital Video Recorders instead of                       videotape 
     •  Lighting should be maintained throughout the facility, and all areas should be illuminated well 
     •  Some facilities have on-site manager(s) for additional oversight  
     •  Offices are alarmed and secured 
     •  The facility manager will be able to provide history of environmental or theft losses, and may have rapport with the neighborhood and local          police 
     •  Although facilities’ insurance policies cover property stored in units (with the exception of vehicles), you will be expected to provide proof           of insurance as well. Many storage facilities also offer this service. 
     •  Climate control (available at some facilities) is important for loss prevention; central air and heat maintain a temperature between 50 and            80 degrees, protecting paper and media against damage from extreme temperatures and humidity. 

Proper Packing of Documentation and Data

     •  Make multiple backups of all stored documents and keep them in a separate location 
     •  Consider using locked containers such as file cabinets or fire safes 
     •  Use airtight packaging to prevent mildew or water damage 
     •  Consider storing all documentation on password-protected CD or DVD; anti-static packaging for videotapes, DVDs and CDs is                            recommended to prevent data loss 
     •  Use racking systems or pallets to keep boxes off floor and organized 
     •  Cover boxes with a tarp 
     •  Fill boxes, even if just with packing material – loosely packed materials can shift during transport and lifting; do not use newspaper, as the          print can transfer 
     •  Packed boxes should weigh no more than 30-50 lbs. for safe lifting 
     •  Pack for longer than you plan to store – just in case\ 
     •  When packing files, place binders in between groupings to lend sturdiness 
     •  Label boxes clearly and carefully with waterproof labels / markers 
     •  Stack boxes with oldest information at the bottom in the back 

Facility managers work with both local clients and national accounts, and are available to verify and document security features. They can be useful assets in establishing risk management plans regarding self storage.
How to Store Musical Instruments
Whether woodwinds, brass, percussion or strings, instruments are much more than the sum of their parts. Storing instruments, the electronic equipment needed to enhance their output such as mixers as amps, sheet music, and digital backups of musical creations must be done the right way to preserve them well. 

Most important is controlling the temperature within the storage unit. Severe temperatures, drastic temperature changes, and above-normal levels of humidity can cause brass instruments to expand and shrink, strings and wood to warp, drum skins to dry, and mildew to grow. Many self-storage facilities offer climate control. This uses central air and heat to maintain a temperature within the unit of 50-80 degrees and reduce humidity. Some facilities have a dehumidifier as well -- usually for units on the first floor or subterranean levels. 

Here are some additional tips for assuring musical instruments, music and equipment are stored in optimal conditions:

Tips for Storing Musical Instruments

     •  Properly prepare instruments for storage, cleaning and conditioning them with paste wax for wood, resin, etc. Never use an oil-based                   polish or alcohol on wood instruments. Disassemble parts, remove reeds, mouthpieces, mutes and straps, and relax strings 
     •  Whenever possible, store instruments in cases designed for them. Cases should be in good condition – clean, with no fraying or powdering.         If a case is not in great condition, line it with buffered acid-free paper (available for purchase at music stores). Inside the case, drape a                clean cloth over strings. For additional protection against humidity, after placing the instrument in the case, place the case in a                              polyethylene bag. 
     •  Cover a piano with a sheet or tarp to protect it from dust 
     •  After storing musical instruments for a lengthy period, be sure to clean and tune them before playing 
     •  In the storage unit, keep instruments away from vents and doors. Make sure they are stored off the floor, on a pallets or shelves 
     •  If you're storing upholstered products such as mattresses and sofas, consider investing in covers, bags or sheeting for additional                          protection. Storage and moving facilities often sell large heavy-duty bags for this purpose. 

Tips for Storing Musical Equipment & Music

     •  Keep electrical equipment and boxes of music off floor with pallets or shelving 
     •  Store backup CDs, DVDs or Flash drives of music in waterproof containers 
     •  Consider having pianos moved professionally. Talk to your storage facility manager or local mover about options 
     •  If it’s worth storing, it’s worth insuring. Most storage facilities require proof of insurance covering your belongings to at least $2,000. At             USA Storage Center, we offer affordable insurance policies for up to $10,000 that can be included in your rental agreement. 

Keep an inventory of stored items – perhaps by taking a picture of each piece before it’s packed. Ideally, include an estimate of the replacement value of item you store. These steps will help you make accurate insurance claims in case of unforeseen damage or loss, and estimate appropriate coverage levels.

Your self-storage facility manager can be a great resource for instruments and equipment. Be sure to ask them for guidance – they may have important information you wouldn’t have considered otherwise.
How to Store Photos, Collectibles, and Mementos
Preserving memories and handing down family heirlooms are important parts of family life, but lack of space can turn treasures into clutter. Self storage provides the extra square footage that you need to save things you would otherwise have to sacrifice for lack of space .

To keep your photos, collectibles and mementos in good condition while in storage, consider the following tips:

Packing Photos and Photo Albums 

     •  Always put paper between photographs to prevent them from sticking together (archival-quality paper is recommended – this can be                   purchased at most photography and craft stores) 
     •  Place a piece of strong cardboard, plastic or wood between groups of loose photos and pack them tightly in boxes to prevent warping 
     •  Only use photo albums that are archival quality 
     •  When placing photo albums, books or magazines in boxes, alternate placing the spine to the right or left 
     •  Seal photos in airtight plastic bags to prevent exposure to moisture 
     •  Label boxes and containers for easy reference 

Packing Fragile Collectibles and Mementos

     •  Use same-size, quality boxes for easy stacking 
     •  Pad the bottom of boxes with foam sheets used for packing dishes (dishpack) 
     •  Wrap each item separately in clean paper; do not use newspaper (the print can transfer) 
     •  Stack glasses, vases and other tall fragile pieces in rows 
     •  Place double layers of paper between rows of packed items 
     •  Pack items firmly next to each other but not too tightly 
     •  Fill empty spots in boxes with packing peanuts or paper to prevent shifting during transport or lifting 
     •  Cut pieces of boxes or cardboard to use as dividers in boxes to prevent shifting 
     •  Reinforce the bottoms of boxes with extra tape, taping the box tops equally as well in case they topple during transport 
     •  Mark boxes as fragile on all sides 
     •  Use wood, cardboard or plastic to raise boxes off the floor 

Climate Control 

Climate control is extremely important for the preservation of photographs and photo albums, as it prevents damage from extreme temperatures. (Ask your self-storage facility manager about this option which is often available for moderate additional cost).  

There are many kinds of packing materials specifically designed to preserve valuable and fragile items. At USA Storage Center, our facilities offer professional-quality boxes and supplies for your convenience. Ask your facility manager about how to get the best use out of these materials, and for other creative storage solutions.
How to Store a Car, Van, or Truck
Whether you own a vintage Impala, a custom Corvette, your mother-in-law’s old Mercury, a lawn care rig or a white panel delivery van, finding a place to store an extra set of wheels can be a headache. Apartment living, downtown office space or a house packed with other stuff makes finding a convenient, inexpensive parking space in a safe, sheltered location difficult to find. 

Rather than taking up any more space in your parking lot, garage, driveway or yard, consider adding extra space through self-storage. Many facilities offer better security and protection from the elements than your business property or home may provide. 

Here are some tips for choosing and making good use of self-storage space:

Choosing Self-Storage for Your Car, Van or Truck

     •  Most storage facilities offer different kinds of parking for your vehicle, allowing you to choose different security features, protection from          the elements and price points: 
               •  Outdoor space and covered outdoor space– these paved or gravel spaces are great for large vehicles, short term storage or                                  property of lesser value; these options are most affordable, least protected from elements and have fewer security features than                          enclosed space 
               •  Drive up garage space – moderate in cost, these spaces usually have a garage-style door inside a basic structure that provides                            protection from the elements and additional security 
               •  Drive up interior space – these spaces within a larger building are the most secure of the different options, and are at the higher end                   cost wise; most of these buildings have central air and heat, providing a climate-controlled environment that keeps the temperature                     in your unit between about 50 and 80 degrees 
     • Consider the size of the vehicle or vehicles you wish to store, as well as any equipment or supplies. Be sure to measure the dimensions of            the door of inside storage units -- some lawn care truck trailers, for example, may be too wide or tall. 
     •  If you plan to frequently use stored vehicles, such as moving trucks, construction trucks or delivery vans, you may wish to choose a unit             close to the facility entrance for easy in and out. 
     •  Since most storage facilities rent on a month-to-month basis, this makes storing vehicles during the off-season or during extended periods          of travel an excellent solution. 
     •  If storing your car, truck or van outside, consider purchasing a cover. If the vehicle is unsightly, the facility manager may request that you          keep it covered. Most facilities offer covers and other packing supplies for convenient purchase. 
     •  At USA Storage Center, many of our classic and sports car owners put carpet down in an indoor space. 

Most facilities have a few basic rules for vehicle storage:

     •  Wheeled vehicles must be in drivable condition (they can’t be towed in and put on blocks) 
     •  Tires must be inflated and in good shape 
     •  Use of a storage unit as a workshop is prohibited, as the facility is not equipped for proper disposal of chemicals 
     •  Most vehicles must be registered and insured, and you must provide proof of each 

Facility managers are a wealth of information about getting the most out of self-storage – ask them any questions you may have about storing your car, truck or van.
How to Store Retail Business Goods
Every square foot of retail space can make money for your business… unless it’s being used for storage. If stacks of supplies, awkward fixtures, seasonal decorations or unused signs that are taking up valuable room in your shop or restaurant, self storage can be a cost-saving option. 

Just about any business can put self storage to profitable use. Brick-and-mortar businesses and online store owners alike need convenient, inexpensive ways to store merchandise, equipment, marketing materials and supplies. In most cases, self-storage space will cost less per square foot than the same space in your restaurant or store. Plus it provides a convenient way to stock up on inventory and stay organized when storage space is limited. 

Keep these guidelines in mind when planning to use self storage for your retail business:

Choosing a Self-Storage Facility

     •  Security at a self-storage facility may exceed what you have in your store or restaurant. Keypad access, security cameras, perimeter                  fencing and on-site management are common security measures in facilities. 
     •  Arranging for deliveries to be accepted by the facility manager is another cost-saving benefit to self storage. Typically the manager                    notifies you by phone when a delivery has arrived, and you can pick up your packages within 24 hours. 
     •  Your schedule may require access to your unit at unusual times such as early morning or late night. Talk with your storage facility                       manager about typical keypad entry access times, or if necessary, special arrangements. Some facilities allow 24-hour access. 
     •  If you plan to store items that are sensitive to extreme heat or cold, or plan to visit your unit regularly for lengthy periods of time, be sure          to check if the facility offers climate- controlled space. This may cost a bit more, but ensures the temperature within your storage space             stays within a more comfortable 50-80 degrees. 

Choosing Self-Storage Units

     •  Estimate size based on long-term use (most people end up storing more for longer periods than they originally planned).  
     •  If you have multiple locations for your business, multiple, smaller storage units can be more convenient than one large unit. Some units               may be used for longer-term storage, while others used primarily for inventory and delivery. 
     •  The location of the unit within the facility can make a difference if you are loading and unloading heavy or awkward objects. A unit near on          the ground floor, near an elevator or close to the entrance may cost a little more, but can save a lot of effort. 
     •  Drive-up or outside storage space is useful for parking delivery vans, lawn care trailers and equipment, and other business-related                      vehicles. 
     •  Storage of non-perishable items such as canned foods or wines is permitted, but perishable items can attract unwanted pests so storing               them is generally prohibited. 
     •  Selling directly from a self-storage unit is typically not allowed. 

Your storage facility manager is a great resource for answers about how self-storage can help your business succeed.
How to Store RVs and Boats
Owning large recreational vehicles such as RVs and boats can add a whole new dimension to your lifestyle. But finding a way to store them conveniently and safely can be a big hassle.

Common problems that often plague RV and boat owners include:

     •  Limited space in a driveway or yard to park the vehicle 
     •  Homeowner association, apartment leasing and municipal parking restrictions 
     •  Protection of the vehicle from damage or theft 
     •  Long travel distances to and from major highways or waterways 

The security and convenience of self-storage can be a great solution to these problems. Here are some key benefits of leasing storage space for your RV or boat:

Security – Most storage facilities use a combination of keypad entry systems, security cameras, fencing and on-duty management personnel to secure your property.

Protection from the elements – Large vehicles can be stored in open air spaces, covered outdoor spaces or drive-up garages with high ceilings (depending on what the facility has available), giving you the option of choosing how much you would like to shield your property from the weather.

Convenient access – Renting space close to a favorite waterway or major thoroughfare means less time and fuel spent getting to and from the fun.

Extra space – Self-storage space allows you to store not just your boat or RV, but all the equipment that goes with it. Adding additional off-site square footage to the storage space you have available in your home makes staying organized easier, and gives you room to move (and add more toys).

Tips for Storing RVs and Boats

     •  Be sure to check the dimensions of a potential storage unit. Most RVs require 30-40 feet (USA Storage Center RV units typically go up to         45 feet in length.) Some equipment, such as boat trailers, may be too wide for the door of a drive-up unit, so covered parking would be the           better option. 
     •  To make sure getting in and out is easy, consider the available room for a large turning radius. 
     •  When considering the amount of space you’ll need to store your large vehicle, be sure to include extra room for all the equipment that                 comes with it.  
     •  Some facilities offer electrical plug-ins and sanitary stations. 
     •  Most facilities expect that repairing or extensive maintenance of large vehicles will be done elsewhere. 
     •  RVs and boats must have current license plates. If your tags expire while in storage, your storage facility may ask you to renew them. 
     •  Storage facilities typically require proof of vehicle registration. They may also require proof of insurance, since individual property is not            covered by the facility’s insurance. 
     •  When vehicles will be stored indoors over long periods of time, check fuel lines and gaskets, and lay down cardboard or mats to prevent             damage to the unit’s floor. 
     •  Vehicles or trailers must have properly inflated tires at all times. Keep an eye on tires that can dry rot or deflate. Restrictions vary by                facility, so check with your facility manager about your role in maintaining stored vehicles. 

Your storage facility manager is a great resource to help you make smart choices in self-storage for your RV or boat.
Choose the Right Size Self Storage Unit
Estimating how much space you will need for your storage items can be simple if you know what you want to store. Here are some simple steps to help you plan, and size recommendations based on commonly-stored items. 

Step 1:  Start by making a list of the items you plan to store.

Step 2:  Group the items according to how you will organize them. 

Start by identifying items that will be packed in boxes and stacked. Next, prioritize boxed items you will want to access most frequently (they’ll go closer to the front of the unit). Then group by fragility or weight – heavier, sturdier items should be stored on the bottom of stacked items, fragile items on top. Then consider awkwardly-sized items that won’t stack well, including how often you will need to use them, and how heavy they are.  

Step 3: Make note of how these items will be packed and organized. 

Boxes and containers should be of uniform size, and should be stacked no more than three- or four-high, depending on the size and strength of the containers you use. At USA Storage Center, our customers often use heavy-duty plastic stackable drawers for easy access to stored items. 

There are several basic sizes of storage units. Below is a quick-reference guide to help you plan what size unit you will need for your personal or business storage:

Storage of Personal Items

     •  5' x 5' (25 sq. ft.) – Will hold a chest of drawers, a small mattress set, boxes and small items. Useful for garden tools, or seasonal                         decorative items.
     •  5' x 10' (50 sq. ft.) – Will hold furnishings of a mid-size bedroom, including a queen-size bed, dresser, TV, and a few storage boxes. 
     •  10' x 10' (100 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of an entire family room or two full bedrooms. 
     •  10' x 15' (150 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of up to three bedrooms in this unit. Recommended for larger items such as pianos, couches,           tables, or large-screen TVs.
     •  10' x 20' (200 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of a five-bedroom house, including a refrigerator, washer/dryer, dining room table, chairs and          large boxes.
     •  10' x 30' (300 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of a 5- to 7-bedroom house, including large items such as a couch, bed, fridge, and                             entertainment center. 

Storage of Business Items

     •  5' x 5' (25 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of a large office closet filled with files, books, office chairs, and a few storage boxes.
     •  5' x 10' (50 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of one office room, including desks, bookcases, filing cabinets and large storage boxes. Ideal               for storing equipment and tools.
     •  10' x 10' (100 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of an entire office, including desks, chairs, computers and a few storage boxes.
     •  10' x 15' (150 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of three office rooms could fit in this size unit, including several desks, computers and boxes. 
     •  10' x 20' (200 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of five office rooms (desks, computers, bookcases and file cabinets) in this size, or a five-                 year supply of business and tax files. 
     •  10' x 30' (300 sq. ft.) – Will hold the contents of five office rooms – many desks, several large boxes, seasonal storage, a few sets of large          storage shelves and/or a few pallets of inventory, depending on how high you stack them. 

It is always a good idea to visit potential storage units to get a visual sense of the space you will be working with. 

Your storage representative can answer any questions you may have, and give you suggestions on how to store your items to maximize space.
Insuring Your Stored Items
You may think that successful self-storage means your extra stuff is out of sight, out of mind. But it’s just as easy to overlook insuring your prized possessions when they’re stored remotely. In most cases, your homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy will offer little or no coverage for the contents of a storage unit.   

Self-storage facilities don’t automatically offer coverage either. Although your lease should include coverage of any damage that occurs to the storage building itself, this protection does not extend to your business or personal belongings. Additional insurance is usually offered for a minimal monthly fee that is combined with your rental fee for one easy payment. This small investment translates into some notable benefits: 

     •  Low cost / low deductible – You may be able to save quite a bit on the cost of insuring your items by going with a self-storage facility                    policy. For example, at USA Storage Center we offer $2,000 to $10,000 of insurance coverage on your belongings for a monthly fee of $8            to $38.  This insurance covers damage to your belongings in the event of a variety of accidental circumstances, including fire, water                     damage, and theft. The deductible is only $100, which is significantly less than that of a homeowner’s insurance policy.
     •  Separate deductible – Claims are filed through the storage facility’s insurance company, rather than your own insurance company.                       Therefore, these claims will not affect the amount of your monthly homeowner’s or renters insurance premium, nor cause your personal or          business policy to be cancelled. 
     •  In-transit coverage - Insurance policies offered through most storage facilities cover any items that are damaged in transit -- up to a 50-             mile radius. This is coverage that is most likely not offered through your homeowner’s or renter’s insurance policy.
     •  Supplemental coverage - If you are a business owner, you may already have insurance that covers equipment and other items you’ll be               storing in a self-storage unit. However, you may wish to consider investing in the insurance offered by the storage facility, as it provides              good supplemental coverage for your items. 

Most items commonly stored are covered under self-storage insurance policies, with one exception – vehicles. Most require stored vehicles to be covered by an auto insurance policy. You will need to provide proof of this coverage when you sign your storage rental lease. 

Whether you are planning to store your personal belongings or items for your business, make sure to calculate how much you estimate your items are worth. That way, you can purchase the appropriate amount of insurance and have peace of mind that your belongings are covered.
Self Storage Tips for Business Owners
A cramped workspace can make it difficult to find what you need, distracting you from business at hand. Excess inventory, samples, supplies and paperwork tend to pile up quickly in small spaces, requiring extra effort to keep things organized. You may have considered renting additional commercial space or trying to squeeze more room in your home-based office, but were put off by the cost and loss of valuable time to planning and construction. That’s why, for today’s businessperson, self-storage is a cost effective and efficient solution. 

At USA Storage Center, we find that most of our business owners make use of self-storage not just for long-term, but also short-term solutions. 

     •  During remodeling, redecorating, or downsizing your business 
     •  When relocating your business 
     •  Storing seasonal furnishings such as patio furniture, grills, outdoor kiosks, etc. 
     •  Storing excess inventory before the start of the holiday season 

Essentially, a storage unit can function much like an extra office. Take advantage of these tips to get the most of our investment:

Tip #1: Make a list of all of the items you’ll be storing in your unit, and keep an ongoing inventory.

Based on this list, you can then determine the amount of space you will need. With proper packing and organization you can fit a lot more in a self-storage unit than may appear. The self-storage site manager is an expert at this, and will work with you to ensure that you’re choosing the size you need. 

It’s easy to forget over time what you’ve taken out or added to your storage space, especially if several employees frequently access the unit. Consider keeping a running inventory on a PDA, laptop or website in order to keep tabs on stored items whether you’re at the unit or your office.

This is valuable information not only for staying organized, but for insuring the items you’re storing. 

Tip #2: Consider climate control. 

Climate control maintains a steady temperature of between 55–80° using central air conditioning and heat. Maintaining a steady environment prevents warping, rust, yellowing, mold, and infestation of vermin.

If you’re going to store computers or computer parts, climate control is a must. The same goes for sensitive equipment, important paperwork, pharmaceutical samples, furniture, or anything else that may be damaged by extreme heat or cold. It also provides a pleasant temperature while you are retrieving or organizing your stored belongings. In most cases there is an additional cost for climate control; however, it is ultimately an excellent return on investment in loss protection.

Tip #3: Proper packing is key. 

Although self-storage units are intended to protect your belongings from the elements, additional steps should be taken to protect the items you are storing, especially if they are of high value. 

     •  Computers should ideally be put in a box and then packed securely (link to section on Boxes and Packing Supplies you can buy) with                    packing peanuts or some other type of foam insulation. 
     •  Archival documents, photos, or other paperwork should be packed in boxes that are roughly the same size so they can be easily stacked in         the storage unit. 
     •  Office furniture can be turned on end vertically. For more information and advice on how to pack and organize a self-storage unit, see                 Packing Efficiently (link to article). 

When you’re planning how you will pack your items, consider how frequently you plan to access them. Some packing methods are much easier to change as necessary, and less messy to work with.

By following these tips, and working with your self-storage manager, you will find this solution to be one that takes the least amount of valuable time away from your primary tasks.
What Kinds of Vehicles can be Stored in a Self Storage Unit?
Self-storage units are a convenient place to store vehicles of virtually any type. Keeping your car, truck, van, RV, ATV, golf cart, boat, motorcycle, jet ski or trailer at a storage facility frees up valuable space on your property or in your garage. Since most storage facilities rent on a month-to-month basis, this makes storing vehicles during the off-season or during extended periods of travel an excellent solution. 

Accommodations for vehicle storage vary from facility to facility. Some offer uncovered areas; others provide parking lots with roofs. Smaller vehicles like jet skis and motorcycles can be stored inside a typical enclosed self-storage unit. Certain facilities have a dedicated area for RVs, with a choice of covered or uncovered parking spaces. 

At USA Storage Center, we recommend our customers consider these questions before signing a lease agreement:

     •  What types of units and open spaces they offer for vehicles ( e.g., covered or uncovered)
     •  What size units or spaces are available (what is the maximum length of the vehicle that can be stored in those areas)
     •  Whether the facility has a service station for cleaning and maintaining vehicles on the premises
     •  If electrical outlets / RV hookups are available for charging batteries, heating or cooling, and lighting vehicles while you clean or fix them
     •  Whether climate control is available (regulating the temperature in a storage unit can be important if you live in an area with extreme hot           and cold temperatures)
     •  Acceptable ways to transport your vehicle to and from the facility
     •  Hours of operation for bringing, removing, and accessing your vehicle
     •  Is the facility clean and neat?
     •  What security features are available at the site? 

Most facilities have a few basic rules for vehicle storage:

     •  Wheeled vehicles must be in drivable condition, (i.e. must be driven onto the lot) 
     •  Most vehicles must be registered and insured, and you must provide proof of each
     •  Tires must be inflated
     •  Customers are prohibited from occupying vehicles while in storage. 

Be sure to check with the self-storage facilities in your area about the specifics of their policies before you decide where to store your vehicle.

Be sure to find the location closest to you!